UK Brexit, and the Euro's Domino Effect

Economists Fear a European Domino Effect  

No one knows what happens next as the entire U.K. — including England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland — pulls away from the EU. As of this story going to press, 4 additional countries have drafted proposals to leave the euro—this is called a “domino effect,” and our Renegade News International Economic Reports see a trend that of the nineteen member countries currently on the Euro, ten will leave, and switch to using dominos as currency by 1-Sep-2016.


The impact of switching to a domino based currency will initially leave those countries with a destabilized economy, totally dependent upon their financial leaders' steady hand and artistry. On a positive note, Domino Tourism (DomiTouri) is expected to soar and ease concerns while in transition.

Using dominos for currency is not a new concept. It dates back to the ancient Aztec civilizations who used dominos years before the Spanish conquest. The use of dominos as money throughout the Colonial period (1521-1810) was accompanied by the use of Spanish coins. The Spaniards introduced pesos. Initially one domino was worth 1/8 of a peso. By 1545, in the Tlaxcallan market, 1 peso equaled 200 dominos. Dominos lost favor due to their bulk and were replaced by reales in 1560.


The euro (sign: €; code: EUR) is the official currency of the eurozone, which consists of 19 of the 28 member states of the European Union: Austria, Belgium, Cyprus, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Ireland, Italy, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, the Netherlands, Portugal, Slovakia, Slovenia, and Spain.

Derek and the Dominos were a blues rock band formed in the spring of 1970 by guitarist and singer Eric Clapton, keyboardist and singer Bobby Whitlock, bassist Carl Radle and drummer Jim Gordon.

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